sna poems, #116: pine hollow

a winding rural road up one of the baraboo hills out past baxter’s hollow took us to the top of pine hollow. pine hollow sna is a sandstone and baraboo quartzite gorge roughly 300 ft deep w/ flanking cliffs as high as 80 ft (according to the dnr’s page). a wide variety of life here, as the deep gorge affords a variety of habitats. hemlocks and white pines tower over the cliffs.

moss and ferns lie thick on the ground along the stream bed. there’s also a sedge meadow at the bottom of the hollow, but we spent our time up in the stony heights.

a late spring snow was falling and swirling up and down the gorge while icicles hung off the outcrops along with the moss and liverworts. trackless and gorgeous (pun very much intended). also, a first id of rattlesnake plantain.

a.

spring snow in the pines

bare sand stone

and conglomerate

b.

outcrop icicle

pudding stone

ferns matting gravel

sna poems, #115: baxter’s hollow

our day in the baraboo hills started in earnest at baxter’s hollow, a broad gorge formed in the bluffs by otter creek with the largest stretch of unbroken forest in southern wisconsin—almost 6,000 acres, some still held in private hands. a rugged path marches thru the main site, but it feels very remote inside.

snow fell much of the time, but the sun peeked out toward the end of our hike. then we spent some time down by otter creek as we made our way out. a serious sanctuary for many aquatic insects, wildflowers, mammals, and especially birds who live away from edges. we exulted in the quartzite.

first id of hermit thrush—saw a few!

a.

marsh marigold fresh

into bloom

along the spring run

b.

under a light snow

moss growing

on tumbled quartzite

c.

in the leaf-bare wood

hermit thrush

flits from branch to branch

d.

reaching out fair limbed

under clouds

the oak against time

e.

below the white pines

the otter,

a wary spider

you can’t see her from this the distance my wife took this picture, but the spider named in the lune above was trepidatiously crawling on my knee here.

and now, the liverwort we found by otter creek, up late this year it seems:

sna poems, series anthropocenum #18: baraboo river at pine haven

i’m enamored with the baraboo river, have been since i was a kid driving above it on hwy 33 thru the town of baraboo. we stayed at pine haven west of town, east of the lower narrows. the baraboo lies along the southwestern border of the property, and i had a chance to walk along its stretch first thing in the morning.

the alterations to the land and water (clearly going way back) were interesting, there’s an old defunct bridge’s stone foundations left looming over the river, and some ducks i couldn’t get a good look at kept flying further upstream as i tried to spy them out. snow flitting down.

a.

a spooked drake flies off

the mud bank

soft and pliable

b.

matins in grey dawn

by river—

heron on his siege

sna poems #114: pewit’s nest

pewit’s nest is a sandstone gorge thru which runs skillet creek. it appears the gorge was formed when glacial lake wisconsin burst its shores and carved out all manner of getaways in the surrounding terrain. it’s a beauty with several low waterfalls and a small forest surrounding.

on this trip, some titmice welcomed us onto the path, virginia waterleaf was getting going, and we had the pleasure of meeting a barred owl just hanging out in the top of a conifer growing on the northern side of the gorge.

the site was being abused by folks leaving garbage and tromping off the trails a while back, and i was glad to see that it looks like things are going better now, and that it’s because the dnr enabled access rather than denying more access. that is, they made more deliberate paths, put up wooden fences to steer folks thru the site and off the bluffs etc. good stuff and a welcome end to easter sunday 2022.

a.

the grey titmouse crest

on iron

flash of rust away

b.

here the weeping ferns

the moss rows

cool below the falls

c.

perched above the slope,

the pine bough:

brown and white cascade

so many woodpeckers knocking on wood on these hikes. all over.

new organ-themed poem in _paddler press #4_ (w/ audio)

many thanks to paddler press for giving a home to my self-evidently titled poem on the free organ concerts held at st. hedwig’s church here in the east village before covid hit, “on free east village organ concerts in september.”

you can read it here (on p 32), there’s audio of me reading it just below, and do have a read thru of the rest of the issue too!

below is a view of st. hedwig’s in her cream-city-brick glory, where the titular concert took place in 2019. the featured image at the top is the pair of imperial-looking chickens atop the main doors. (i realize they’re not chickens.)

sna poems #113: milwaukee river and swamp

milwaukee river and swamp sna is a mixed site with lowland forest, conifer swamp, and shrub zones. the east branch of the milwaukee river flows thru the site, and it hugs mauthe lake. the lake, river, and wetlands make the site a popular home and migration corridor for birds. we saw a song sparrow, common mergansers, buffle heads, a bald eagle, and downy woodpeckers, along with several more common species. my wife spotted the eagle standing on the lake ice a few hundred yards off and then it took off and flew right over us, as cranes called from further afield.

the walk thru the lowland hardwood forest was full of life, even at this early part of the year. so much to hear and smell and see and touch. we didn’t make it far enough to get to the swamp, but there’s always next time.

a.

common mergansers

with brilliant

red bills, just floating

b.

soft thumb of willow

wild array

song sparrow on branch

c.

bald eagle over

east branch’s

sand and gravel bed

d.

the geese will not stop

their honking—

the witch’s butter

poem in new online lit mag

the premier issue of magpie literary journal has gone live, and the editor saw fit to include one of my poems. this one is a conceit on having a daughter and is set on the shores of a wave-battered lake michigan. it also uses dripping pathos more than is my usual, but having children will do such things to a writer. 🙂

i know a few of the other folks who have poems appearing, and highly recommend reading thru the whole issue.

pax inter spinas

sna poems #112: spring lake (now w/ video!)

spring lake is an alkaline lake surrounded by fen and northern wet forest. the wdnr says the shoreline is a bog shelf and that plants characteristic of fens and bogs live together in the mats of vegetation surrounding, an odd combination.

we were game for it, and the area was inviting (especially with rubber boots). we were welcomed most prominently by two (then three) sandhill cranes making regular calls the whole time we were there, with the echoes of another pair somewhere beyond the tamaracks sounding in between.

the year’s first sighting of skunk cabbage!

a.

cranes stand on the ice

calling out—

here in the cattails

(you can hear the cranes calling here. a couple a half mile away or so kept calling back.)

b.

a single oak leaf

under ice

cool breeze between trees

c.

over tamaracks,

skunk cabbage,

polypores: grey sun

sna poems #111: spruce lake bog

spruce lake bog is classic bog territory. a (relatively) undisturbed bog lake in a kettle, very diverse flora more characteristic of northern sphagnum bogs, according to the wdnr’s description.

i was grateful for the boardwalk that allowed for a walk all the way thru the bog to the lake thru the sphagnum and the bog forest of tamaracks and black spruces and some hardwoods. a light rain was falling and just warm enough not to bundle up.

highlight for sure was the pitcher plants thick on the ground (first id). amazing.

a.

red floral fingers

in the rain

spiders in and out

b.

tumbling tangle

sprawled beneath

the bare tamaracks