sna poems #137: ableman’s gorge

a gorge cut into baraboo quartzite, cambrian sandstone, and conglomerate by the baraboo river. the scene here in the upper narrows is very interesting, with van hise rock (an outcropping that helped charles van hise of uw-madison geology fame articulate principles of structural deformation and metamorphism) popping up over the road along with old quarry scars and a public spring for drinking water.

a gorgeous, clear, unseasonably warm spring morning, me and the kiddos piled into the van and drove here from the dells where we were staying. we checked out the spring and van hise rock, then climbed a bluff to the southwest of the baraboo river.

couldn’t believe how game the kids were, going straight up the bluff, but the first really clear morning with sun and heat on the back and cardinals singing out over the valley—couldn’t resist. also, the first liverwort buds and trout lilies coming up. also took a moment down by the river to pay my respects. would like to get back here sometime.

a.

skirting gorge’s ridge

cardinal call

atop the cherries

b.

the upper narrows

at dawning

liverwort flowers

c.

baraboo river

cut quartzite

here and gone a thief

two poems w/ audio in _ballast_ journal

hi folks. ballast is a new literary journal edited by two poets doing good work. they’ve kindly accepted two of my poems for issue #2—one a lune made in the california redwoods (hence the redwood sorrel pictures), the other a long section of my long natural-family-personal history poem (probably the work i’m proudest of in the last few years).

they also gave me the pleasure of recording audio for the poems. you can see and read them here, and do give a look around the rest of the issue while you’re there!

sna poems, series supplementum #36: brady’s rocks

brady’s rocks is a dolostone outcropping of the niagra escarpment in waukesha cty’s southern unit kettle moraine state forest. the ice age trail cuts right thru this delightful small maze where an irish immigrant (the eponymous brady) once quarried stone in the mid-19th century. some rare plants and massive oaks.

it had been too long since we’d been out, and the kids called it for this site, as our last visit here had been heavily mosquito-infested a few summers ago. (to the point that we all literally ran thru the site and back out.) much nicer now in the march chill!

first id of walking fern, slender rockcress, and white avens!

a.

liverwort and cranes

returning

the mammals rejoice

b.

ring round dolostone

the oak arms

reform the gray sky

c.

on your limy perch

the tapered

leaves radiating

sna poems #134: high cliff escarpment

high cliff escarpment state natural area is inside high cliff state park in calumet cty, wisconsin on the eastern shore of lake winnebago. here is a fantastic length of exposure of the niagra escarpment, the dolostone rock formation that arcs from southeastern wisconsin to niagra falls.

a hardwood forest atop the escarpment contains a number of effigy mounds, mostly water panthers and a set of twin buffaloes. the combination of the gloaming, shagbark hickories, mounds, and limestone was exquisite. three lunes here to celebrate.

three generations of riyeffs up and down the cliffs. last sna in calumet cty!

a.

lake winnebago

quietly

all the frozen waves

b.

spreading tobacco

on the mounds

no bird call, no stars

c.

the ledge tumbling

so slowly

thousands of sunsets

sna poems #133: stockbridge ledge woods

the christmas vacation almost over, i made a brash decision to head up to calumet county for two sna’s, converging on lake winnebago with three generations of family.

stockbridge ledge woods was the first stop, a mature forest atop the niagra escarpment, according to the wdnr website. lots of sugar maple, beech, and oak. though it’s january, it was in the upper 30s so felt like a thaw. some snow still clinging, but lots of places bare too. lots of moss and lichen, but also some liverwort coming up (or hanging on?), and some grasses still green. woodpeckers briefly the only sounds aside from upright primates.

the niagra escarpment, made of ordovician-silurian dolomite, is the edge of an ancient sea with exposures from new york thru southeastern wisconsin. the exposures in this part of wisconsin are known collectively as “the ledge.”

a.

the westering sun

shadows snow

new beech making home

b.

wood ears in oak leaves

surviving

january thaw

c.

early liverwort

or last year’s?

woodpeckers all ’round

if you’ve made it this far, diminutive mushrooms:

sna poems, #129: south bluff/devil’s nose

just under 3,500 acres in the baraboo hills abutting the southern shore of devil’s lake, south bluff/devil’s nose is (by southern wi standards) a huge swath of oak and maple forest. according to the dnr’s website, it’s home to a number of rare birds and plants, and pine glen and messinger creek are found here, though we didn’t encounter these this trip. devil’s nose is the eastern end of south bluff, along where the railroad curves out and away from devil’s lake.

our trip was up the first, northwestern-most bluffside in the site, as the kids were along. but they had already hiked the east bluff and gone to ski-hi (apple orchard) by this time, so i was immensely impressed by their stamina and eagerness on this gorgeous, off-trail, up-bluff, windy, sometimes a little rainy hike. it was a fabulous time, and my first time on the south bluff after nearly forty years of visiting devil’s lake. will be coming back.

p.s. my camera was struggling w/ our starting to lose the light on an overcast midwestern day, so photos a little rough. i’ve taken a few sharper images from my wife’s too.

a.

the maples blowing

are the bluffs’

evening offering

b.

the yellowing oaks

keep secrets

above the south shore

c.

under fall shower

the plantain

seeds stand just waiting

d.

a quartzite fern-stand

lovely at none

over dead bear cone

sna poems #125: cherney maribel caves

the cherney maribel caves are part of a 50-ft outcropping dolostone bluff in manitowoc cty. most of the “caves” are indentations at the foot of the exposed bluff, but a small army of very dedicated volunteers have been clearing out the actual cave in the bluff. apparently (our very informative tour guide in the cave informed us), water has been trickling down thru lifelines in the dolostone for millennia, carving out the caverns with all manner of fantastic features. but then the last glacier filled in the cave with till and moraine from a sinkhole. they’ve been slowly removing the deposit, which filled the caverns about six feet high before removal.

beautiful hardwood wood too, with cedars on the base of the cliffs. well worth the visit.

first id of herb-robert!

a.

carbonic acid

thru lifeline,

leaves, and living rock

b.

amphibian legs,

harvestmen

over the caverns

c.

inside dolostone—

what to say

about the rock’s heart?

sna poems #123: oakfield ledge

oakfield ledge is a section of the niagra escarpment of dolostone that ranges from new york up thru canada down into wisconsin a bit west of where i live in milwaukee. here the outcroppings are not as dramatic as door county’s shoreline cliffs, but they’re quieter and more heavily colonized by life given that they’re surrounded by woods.

at this site in fond du lac county (not manitowoc like i put on twitter a few times!), deep fissures have formed in the dolostone’s fractures. b/c of this, we were able to get down into the escarpment, a first for me. usually the ledge is the side of a hill or a dropoff into water, so one can see it or walk on top of it, but not thru it. we spent a good amount of time down in the canyon. lots of life all over though, in the wood and in the little oak savanna on the edge of the site. late summer in the midwest.

the wdnr site says that a diverse snail fauna lives at the cliff base, but we sadly didn’t find any…

first id’s of white baneberry and pale-flowered leaf cup!

a.

eastern wood pewee’s

two-tone call,

serenading oaks

b.

red fungal body

on the ledge

going back to soil

c.

in the niagra

escarpment:

stone and wet and fern

d.

on the savanna—

chip-chip-chip—

we hear the redstart

sna poems, series supplementum #34: new camaldoli fence loop trail

new camaldoli hermitage, founded in 1959 by camaldolese monks based in italy, sits on a mountain in the santa lucia range overlooking the pacific ocean in big sur, california. it is a vibrant contemplative community of monks with daughter houses in berkeley and san luis obispo.

i have a particular affection for the camaldolese since my spiritual mother‘s teacher was bede griffiths, an english benedictine monk who ended up as superior at saccidananda ashram in tamil nadu, india, which ended up incorporated into the camaldolese order. plus, i’m very keen on the works of one of new camaldoli’s original monks, fr. bruno barnhart, and of the current prior, cyprian consiglio. the hermitage is well worth checking out if you’re in the area or looking for a spectacular place for a retreat.

the fence loop trail winds up beyond the hermitage, and we hadn’t climbed it before our visit a couple weeks ago. a beautiful walk with views of canyon and mountain and ocean and sky. redwoods and granitic rock.

first id of vetchling.

a.

carboniferous

but standing:

a scorched redwood grove

b.

purple pincushions

underfoot—

all god’s creatures hum

c.

clouds rolling below

limbs weary

but the soul refreshed

sna poems #118: natural bridge and rockshelter

my friends, the natural bridge and rockshelter sna has exactly that, a formation cut into the sandstone over millions of years and the largest in the state. excavations done here reveal remains and artifacts dating back to ca. 9,000-8,000 bc. (!) it’s a wonder surrounded by upland oak forests and remnant prairie.

we’d visited before (and my wife, mamie, graciously agreed to be in a few shots for scale), but it’s been too long. the rock shelter is 60′ wide and 30′ deep, but it was late in the day and i simply didn’t have the energy for more pictures. next time (again). it was hard to see all the initials and words carved into the bridge’s base; i’m not a stickler for humans not interacting with natural environments that are being preserved, but the degree of defacement is tough.

up and down and up and down, then some tiny virginia waterleaf just starting out.

a.

for ten-thousand years

we’ve lingered*

in this neighborhood

b.

you’ve sprung out the earth

been festooned

with verdant drapery

c.

ridges and pockmarks

triumphant

over wind, sand, oak

  • “we’ve lingered” referring to our species, in no way attempting to erase the 200 years of the settler-colonial project in wisconsin.